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WORDS DO MATTER tool 5 icon teminology2x


Language is critical in shaping and reflecting our thoughts, beliefs and feelings. Some words degrade and diminish people with disabilities. Always try to avoid stereotypical depictions of people with disabilities. Promote "people first!"


PUT THE PERSON FIRST

Still, individuals have their own preferences. If you are not sure what words to use, simply ask the person!

SAY AVOID SAYING
Person with a disability Disabled person; invalid person; handicapped
Person with multiple disabilities The disabled; the challenged; crippled
Person with Tourette Syndrome That person has Tourette Syndrome
Person who has Cerebral Palsy He suffers from Cerebral Palsy


Many people with disabilities dislike terms such as "physically challenged" and "differently abled". If you are not sure what words to use, A-T-P: Ask The Person!

SAY AVOID SAYING
Person who uses a wheelchair Confined to a wheelchair; wheelchair-bound
Person who has a physical or mobility disability Cripple


The wheelchair is what enables the person to get around and participate in society; it’s liberating, not confining.

SAY AVOID SAYING
Person with a disability since birth Birth defect; deformity; congenital defect
Has Down syndrome Mongol; mental
Person who is blind The blind person
Person with a visual impairment Visually impaired
Short-statured person Dwarf; midget
Hearing impaired (Lack of speech usually results from impaired hearing) Deaf and dumb; deaf and mute


People with disabilities are generally comfortable with the terminology used to describe daily activities. For example, people who use wheelchairs go for “walks,” and people with visual impairments “see” what you mean.




Disclaimer:

HIRE for TALENT has made every effort to use the most respectful words possible while writing these materials. We realize, however, that the most appropriate terminology may change over time. We developed these materials with the intent to respect the dignity and inherent rights of all individuals.

This document is provided for information purposes only. The content provided is not legal advice and should not be used or relied upon as such.
Applicable law may differ from jurisdiction to jurisdiction; if you are seeking legal advice, you are advised to consult a lawyer in your province or territory.




Take the Challenge!

Which is proper to say? A person with a visual impairment or A visually impaired person

Words do matter. Put the person first. It is proper to say: A person with a visual impairment



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FREE EMPLOYER TOOLKIT

The toolkit offers a variety of informative tools. Learn about the skills people with disabilities bring to the workplace and use our ‘how-to’ resources, that provide practical tips and strategies on successful recruitment, hiring, inclusion and retention of people with disabilities.

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There is help to become an inclusive employer! HIRE for TALENT has a network of organizations offering services and programs designed to help your business recruit, hire, train and retain people with disabilities. After consulting the employer toolkit, call a HIRE for TALENT, Disability Confident PARTNER to find-out what services are available near you!

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FACTS & STATS

Employers often find that workers who identify as having disabilities have unique abilities; they also tend to work harder to prove themselves.
According to employers, people with disabilities perform as well or better than other workers. These employers concluded that hiring people with disabilities did not negatively impact their businesses.
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In a national survey of consumer attitudes towards various companies, 92% of the respondents gave favourable ratings to businesses that hire people with disabilities.
98% were satisfied or very satisfied with the service they received when dealing with an employee with a disability.